Friday, October 7, 2016

It's Fast Forward >> Friday!

Join us for tonight's event at the Center for Architecture + Design!
1218 Arch Street | 6 - 8pm
Click to Register

Friday, September 30, 2016

Meet Fast Forward Presenter >> Phantazia Washington

What is your Big Idea for Philadelphia?
Policy 252: Creating Safe and Affirming Schools for
Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Students


Nothing about us without us! So often policies, laws and customs are created without the impute of those they seek to support, but real change requires that those impacted don’t just have their voice heard, but that they have a seat at the table. So what happens when The Attic Youth Center (Philadelphia’s LGBTQ youth center) reached out to The School District of Philadelphia to host a listening session about the experiences of transgender and gender and non-conforming youth? Well, change happened. This session, “Policy 252: Creating Safe and Affirming Schools for Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Students” will cover the history, content, and implementation, of The School District of Philadelphia’s Policy 252 on transgender and gender non-conforming students, as well as share the ways that this policy enables all students, transgender and cisgender alike to reach their fullest human and intellectual potential.


Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Meet Fast Forward Presenter >> Bill Kilpatrick

What is your Big Idea for Philadelphia?
Community through Tall Ship Sailing and Historical Preservation


Philadelphia’s waterfront has seen immense growth and development in recent years, with many events, public spaces, and recreational activities being offered along the rivers. Residents of the city and surrounding areas, along with many of the city’s millions of visitors each year, enjoy Philadelphia’s waterfront each year. My vision for Philadelphia’s future includes growth in these areas, but with a particular focus on knowledge of (and participation in) activities that take place on (and not just beside) the water. I’d like to see more of an awareness of the many sailing, boating, kayaking, and other water activities and events that exist in Philadelphia - and an appreciation of the role the waterfront plays in the city/region's economy and history.



Monday, September 26, 2016

Meet Fast Forward Presenter >> Paul Thompson

What is your Big Idea for Philadelphia?
Revolutionary 21st Century Philadelphia


Philadelphia was founded by William Penn in 1682. We love old cities like Philadelphia because they are living history, represent American culture and have beautiful historic buildings, streets and places.
The Philadelphia Historical Commission lists more than 22,000 properties and 15 historic districts in the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places. Established in 1955, the Philadelphia Historical Commission is the City of Philadelphia’s regulatory agency responsible for ensuring the preservation of historically significant buildings, structures, sites, objects, interiors and districts in Philadelphia.
Leading cities around the country – and world – are making aggressive commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 80 percent by 2050. Philadelphia’s buildings account for 60 percent of the city’s greenhouse gas emissions, making this sector the single-great opportunity for meeting the 80x50 goal. One way to reduce those emissions is by improving the energy efficiency of Philadelphia’s building stock. As part of Greenworks, Philadelphia’s comprehensive sustainability plan, the city set a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 20 percent from 1990 and 2006 baselines by 2015. Philadelphia has not achieved these goals yet: private and public citizens need to act immediately to achieve this level of deep carbon reduction.



In this presentation, we assert:
- Old cities must stay vibrant and alive, cherish the past and embrace the future
- Historic and cultural preservation must consider the need to address climate change
- Historic properties must help reduce greenhouse gas emissions
- Philadelphia must be a leader in the energy reduction revolution
- NOW IS THE TIME TO LEAD!

Friday, September 23, 2016

Meet Fast Forward Presenters >> Alex McNeil & Gregory Trainor

What is your Big Idea for Philadelphia?
Philadelphia Community Corps:
Salvaging our past to reimagine the future



Philadelphia has an estimated 50,000 abandoned buildings. These neglected structures lower property values, attract crime, and present dangers such as collapse and fire. Removing these buildings would have a positive impact on the city - this lies at the core of what the Philadelphia Community Corps has set out to do.

Traditionally, building removal has been done by demolition - using heaving machinery to reduce structures to rubble and send them to the landfill. Instead, the PCC utilizes the method of deconstruction to systematically dismantle buildings and salvage the materials for reuse or recycling. Through this process we keep nearly 90% of the “waste” out of the landfill while employing 7 times as many people as a demolition crew. Further, since we are not relying on heavy, pollution causing, machinery to smash the building, we are reducing the amount of dust and toxins (such as lead and asbestos) released into the air.

In addition to blight removal, the utilization of this method can create jobs in the deconstruction industry and other fields around material reuse. Our job training programs work with individuals who face barriers to employment - providing the skills and experiences for meaningful careers in sustainable development and material reuse. 



Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Meet Fast Forward Presenter >> Mira Treatman

What is your Big Idea for Philadelphia?
Selling Out: A Future Art Market for Philadelphians


The notion that an artist who panders to outside (financial) powers is automatically labeled a “sell out” must die. “Selling out” is one nugget of something I dub the performance art “cycle of doom.” Individual artists complete a BFA, or worse a MFA, and start an entrepreneurial journey of self-promotion, but not starting a business. We teach our craft, day-job and generally don’t earn
a livable wage from our artistic practice alone. We do this all while training the next generation to come in and compete with us. We toil away in this cycle towards an outdated model of success: having our own non-profit. The future leaders of dance, theatre and the genres in between are going to eviscerate this unproductive cycle and become a model art market. Philadelphia will house
businesses where product-based, revenue generating performance art will sprout. We will reclaim our oft-feared yet extremely necessary place in the market. After all, what would we choose: the volatility of foundations’ funding or that of the market? We can no longer accept that the value of our art decreases if we “sell out.” With lower rent, geographic proximity to other art markets and really no other precedent for this, Philadelphia is a rare city where this is possible.


Monday, September 19, 2016

Meet Fast Forward Presenter >> Tom Maksymiuk

What is your Big Idea for Philadelphia?
Honoring the Past through Prosperity



How does a nonprofit organization maintain a century old 10,000 square foot building on a 4 acre property? With a lot of love and dedication.

Founded in 1909, the Ukrainian American Citizens’ Association was formed to provide aid to Ukrainian causes and assist in resettling refugees from Ukraine. These efforts helped to create a vibrant Eastern European community in the neighborhoods of Poplar and Northern Liberties. After a failed redevelopment effort by the City of Philadelphia in the 1960’s drove away the core membership of the club, it was necessary to find creative ways of staying afloat.

Having strategically focused on maintaining just portions of the property for years, the club is finally in a position to focus on growth instead of survival.

As a rental facility the grounds play host to fundraisers, weddings, and concerts all while volunteers plan events, make light repairs, clean the trash, and stock a regularly open social club.

Here is how we do what multitudes of other nonprofit clubs are doing across the city, coming together as a community to not just survive but thrive.

Is it easy? No. Is it worth it? Definitely.