Monday, October 16, 2017

Thanks to All of the Amazing 2017 Presenters!













Did you attend 2017? Fill out the attendee survey to let us know if you have ideas for future presenters, or comments / suggestions about how we might improve the event!

Friday, October 13, 2017

It's #Lucky Fast Forward Friday!

Here's a sneak peek of tonight's presenter order - Hope to see you there!
6pm | Center for Architecture + Design 1218 Arch Street


Friday, October 6, 2017

Meet Fast Forward Supporter >> Stantec Urban Places Group

What is your Big Idea for Philadelphia?
Creating Authentic Urban Places - Together.


North American cities are in the midst of dramatic demographic changes. Using hard data and on-the-ground experience, we help clients understand these changes and lay out strategies for capturing the new demand for urban living to power redevelopment. Opening our process to all stakeholders, we create plans that turn overlooked demand into authentic places that hum with life. Places that add economic, environmental, and social value for every resident. Places where people want to be.

From outdated brownfield and grayfield sites to award-winning new neighborhoods, villages, and city centers, we bring to life remarkable, vibrant places that connect the entire community.


Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Meet Fast Forward Presenter >> Stephen Gibson

What is your Big Idea for Philadelphia?
Pencoyd Bridge : Binding Industrial Spans to the Schuylkill


In 1850, the site of the former Righters Ferry across the Schuylkill became the headquarters for Pencoyd Iron Works, a steel manufacturing center spanning both sides of the river.  This operation evolved over the decades as the technology of the industrial revolution constantly changed into a manufacturing center employing over 1500 people, with a specialty in Iron Bridge construction.  The newly renovated Pencoyd Bridge now spans this point on the Schuylkill, linking nascent trail systems in both Philadelphia and Bala Cynwyd, presenting new and active pedestrian and public transportation connections between the City and the suburbs.  On each shore, new development plans present a major opportunity to link communities together in both real and symbolic ways. Creating riverfront destinations on each bank will connect people to the river in new ways and bring populations to witness the natural beauty of the river in the context of significant and awe-inspiring industrial heritage artifacts. This presentation will focus on how all of these elements and more, present a future which sees strength in Philadelphia building bonds with its surrounding region, at a place where the two come together at unique threshold.



Monday, October 2, 2017

Meet Fast Forward Presenters >> Izzy Kornblatt & Jason Tang

What is your Big Idea for Philadelphia?
What Should We Learn from the 'Philadelphia School' of Architecture?


From the 1950s through the 1990s, Philadelphia was at the forefront of American design. Philadelphia architects designed national parliament buildings; major museums; buildings all over elite college campuses; as well as the world’s first postmodern building right here in Philly—a modest retirement home at 8th and Spring Garden. Indeed, the major cities of virtually every country in the world are home to buildings imitating those of Louis Kahn and Venturi Scott Brown.

But 20some years later, we’ve become followers. There is no longer a school of thought or style associated with Philadelphia; innovation has moved elsewhere. What happened?

In our Fast Forward Philly talk we hope to argue that a severe diagnosis of the present state of architecture here is the first step toward restoring Philadelphia to its former status as a center of global architecture. We’ll introduce the little-known but hugely important Philadelphia School that put Philly at the center of the map, explain what changed, and argue for a renewed Philadelphia architecture based on the physical qualities that have always set us apart—a rich architectural legacy, William Penn’s tight street grid, and our tremendous variety of neighborhood types.


Friday, September 29, 2017

Meet Fast Forward Presenter >> Dave Brindley

What is your Big Idea for Philadelphia?
Philly: A city where you can get away with a lot of civic innovation


What will you do living in a city where you can get away with a lot of innovation? This is kind of a backhanded compliment to our home.

You can get away with a lot because there are gaps between what the city should look like and what our city does. There are a lot of issues and the city government does not have the personal, resources, or even competency to notice the bad and the good out there.

As I built unsanctioned bike lanes and then an anti-litter initiative, I learned that there are opportunities to unofficially do good in our city. In UCity, I turned a bike lane that was constantly clogged with parked cars into the most used protected bike lane in the city. It has lasted for 3 years, with the police even thinking it is their idea now. NotinPhilly.org is the first map-enabled adopt-a-block site with over 900 citizens who have pledged to clean their block.

As a non-profit, for-profit, or an individual citizen, we can leverage the energy of out citizens and our vibrant media scene to see the change we dream of come to life.



Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Meet Fast Forward Presenters >> Dana Rice & Chris Mulford

What is your Big Idea for Philadelphia?
Sharswood Thrash! A Manifesto for Equitable Preservation Development


Given the current development climate in city and the new Historic Preservation Task Force, Philadelphia is ripe for a new approach to tackling this in the 21st century. We believe that our project working with the Dox Thrash house in North Philadelphia can serve as a model and testing ground for this. Like many neighborhoods in this area it has been in a state of decline since the 1960's, and is often written off as "blighted". But by looking past the decay and seeing the rich history and people that make up the community we were able to see a much different Sharswood. The Dox Thrash House is one of the many historic assets the neighborhood has to offer, but the only locally protected site. The goal of this project is to revive Dox Thrash's legacy of creative entrepreneurship and activism by promoting equitable development practices at the block level through the reuse of his house and associated sites as a community assets. As future preservationists, we see the possibilities and opportunities in investing in what's already there, and want to encourage this as not only as an approach to development but also to historic preservation.